BIG COUNTRY + SMALL POPULATION = UNIQUE ECONOMIC NEEDS

As we all know, this great country of ours has one of the largest land masses of any nation on earth. We are also one of the least populous of all the developed nations of the world. These two factors create the need for certain conditions to be in place, to ensure that Canada’s economy works well for us all. These conditions relate to taxation, energy costs, and, most importantly of all, the value of money itself.

We need to have the lowest possible rates of taxation — that is, we must strive for a system in which each level of government collects only enough tax revenue to fund its current operations ( according to its Constitutional duties ), and no more. We must also strive for an equality of taxation, so that no one pays tax until he or she has earned enough to provide the basic necessities of life for themselves and their dependents, and that once that cost-of-living threshold is exceeded, every person pays at the same rate. Penalizing people for hard work and success is just as wrong as extracting it from those who cannot even meet their basic needs ; both practices must be ended, and never again must they be inflicted on the Canadian people. This is one of those things that sounds obvious, that hardly needs to be said out loud, or written down. And yet, when we observe the current situation. . .

A geographically large country, naturally, means large distances for the transport of raw materials, goods, and people. We also are frequently cursed with cold winters, and blessed with hot summers. And so, affordable energy — gasoline and diesel and jet fuel for transport, heating oil, natural gas, propane, electricity, and yes, coal for heating and cooling our homes and workplaces, and for powering industry — is not only desirable but essential to our well-being, physically as well as economically. This, again, would seem to be an obvious truth, a “no-brainer” in modern parlance. And yet. . .

The third essential condition for a broadly healthy Canadian economy, and one so important that it trumps all others, is a strong, stable currency. Strong, because a country of thirty-five million or so will never achieve the economies of scale of a country like our neighbor to the south, say, with its 350 million-plus people! Therefore we need our pay and our savings to be denominated in a currency that is at least equal in value to the US dollar, preferably higher. Remember that everything we buy is priced in US dollars, whether we realize it or not. A weakened Loonie artificially raises our cost of living above the requirements of reality. Stable because the weakening ( debasement ) of a nation’s currency is the most insidious and destructive form of taxation known to man. In fact, a government that has intentionally and with forethought debased/devalued its currency has committed and act of treason, or at the very least, common theft, against its people. Currency debasement ( more politely and misleadingly called “inflation” ) destroys the value of a human being’s labor ; her ingenuity ; his thrift. And what are those three things, after all — except the bedrock of a truly healthy economy, the most basic tools by which each of us can earn our living, and support ourselves and our families? So then, clearly the need for a strong, stable Loonie is something that, once again, should go without saying. And yet. . . And yet.

Currently, none of these vital conditions are in place. Canadian individuals and businesses alike are subject to a myriad of taxes, often at rates that would make a neighborhood loan shark green with envy. Energy costs are artificially inflated through hidden ( and unnecessary ) taxes, excessive regulation, and a mindless devotion to fanciful pseudoscientific theories, often quite openly. And as for the poor old Canadian dollar, well. . . keeping the Loonie artificially depressed has become pretty much the default position for all the alleged divisions of the political-bureaucratic complex — mainly because it is very lucrative for a very small subset of the population, the subset that contributes large sums to political parties, has connections and clout inside those parties, and can be counted on to provide high-paying-do-nothing jobs to retired politicians. The net effect of this is that ninety-five percent or more of the Canadian public is systematically impoverished for the benefit of a relative handful of insiders. Does that sound like good policy to you?

All of this must be changed, and changed soon. None of the old-guard parties will do anything substantial or even noticeable in these areas, no matter what their election-time rhetoric might be ; a casual glance at recent history will tell anyone that. No, we need to take a new direction. The road less traveled, as it were. We need a fresh approach in this country, and that approach is the People’s Party of Canada led by Maxime Bernier.

And that, as it were, will make all the difference.

 

Another New Year, and maybe — perhaps — a New Era in Canadian Politics

The new year, 2019, is upon us. How are everyone’s resolutions going? Same as mine, I’ll bet! But even if we slip a bit on the determination to quit eating junk food, or cut down on the beer, or to squeeze those sit-ups and crunches into our daily schedule, let us all make one resolution that we really do keep : Let us make 2019 the year that Canadian politics changed for the better. Let us make 2019 the year that government and its institutions started to work for the average Canadian, rather than against them.

Let us make this the year that punitive, confiscatory taxation ended forever ; the year that Canada adopted the principle that the people who earn their money by the sweat of their brows know better than politicians or bureaucrats how they should spend it ; the year that governments restricted themselves to taking only as much revenue as is needed to finance their basic, legitimate functions and services, and no more.

Let us make this the year that governments stopped hounding entrepreneurs out of business, through excessive and unnecessary regulation ; the year that they stopped taking money (taxes) from people making $ 12.00 per hour and giving it to various and sundry corporate welfare bums so they could continue to enjoy seven and even eight-figure incomes, even as the businesses and industries they control continued to gush red ink ; the year that Canada returned to a true free market economy, where governments began to (finally) stick to their duties and stopped trying to pick winners and losers.

Let us make this the year that Canada was made once again a businessman’s economy, once again a working man’s economy, where success is largely determined by work ethic, ingenuity, and thrift ; and let us make this the year we forever consigned to the ash heap of history this banker’s economy, this money-shuffler’s economy, in which we currently find ourselves trapped. For what true progress can be made while the main determiners of success are one’s relationship with one’s investment banker, and a willingness to knowingly take on mountains of debt that can never be repaid?

Above all, let us make this the year that we discarded the scurrilous notion that a country can be made stronger by making its individual citizens and legal residents weaker —  taxing them at 50 % – plus rates, constantly placing restrictions or outright bans on behaviours and pastimes that are of no harm to anyone, putting up artificial barriers to entry throughout numerous industries, etc. — and instead accepted the rather obvious fact that a strong nation can only be made up of strong individual citizens.  

Let us do all these things, friends, and more. Let us stop the bleeding — the bleeding of the Common Man — that has been going on for decades, since the so-called “Progressive Era” found its way into the Canadian body politic. Let us set the people of this great country loose to pursue their goals, their dreams, their passions, without undue interference. Let us do all these things, and in so doing make our country, the True North, strong and free like it never was before. We CAN do this. Indeed, we MUST.

An Historic Opportunity — To Stop Doing Dumb Things

Today,  Peoples Party Of Canada (PPC) leader Maxime Bernier officially filed with Elections Canada to register Canada’s newest political party (I would post a link with pictures, if I knew how to do stuff like that!).  This is an historic day, and it represents an historic opportunity : an opportunity for the people of this country to one day soon elect a government that will stop doing dumb things. 

Too many of us, for far too long, have concentrated on what we think our governments ought to do , as if having everyone’s laundry lists filled and hobby-horses catered to would somehow lead to good governance.  As understandable as this approach may seem (and I have been as guilty of it as anyone else in the past), it is erroneous.  For to achieve that good and sensible balanced governance which all normal people want, avoiding harmful policies — in other words, not doing dumb things — is just as important, maybe even more important, than “doing the right things”.

Imagine then, a government that no longer practiced confiscatory taxation, but instead strove for fairness in the tax system, ensuring that no Canadian paid income tax until he or she had earned enough to support themselves and their dependents, but also making certain that hard work, ingenuity and  success were not punished ;  imagine a government that recognized that the notion of “managing the economy” is patently ridiculous, and thus refrained from all the forms of corporate welfare that have so distorted and held back the economic landscape of this country, and from promoting and subsidizing certain favoured industries at the expense of all others ; imagine a government that would vet all potential immigrants carefully, to ensure that only those who want to come here and live as Canadians, and help to make the country a wealthier, happier place, would be welcomed in, while ensuring that habitual criminals and those looking to import the cultural practices that made their home countries intolerable for so many would be politely turned away ;  imagine a government that would do everything possible to keep the Canadian Dollar strong and stable, therefore preserving the value of every Canadian’s labour, entrepreneurship, and savings,  rather than purposely devaluing it for the benefit of a well-connected few.

And imagine, if you will, a government that would only employ the Canadian Forces if there was a direct national interest in doing so, or if the lives of Canadian citizens were in jeopardy, and would never callously place our soldiers in harm’s way for the sake of making a few brownie points with the UN or NATO, or for preserving the silly notion that one can practice “peacekeeping” in places where the peace has not even been made.  

The dumb policies mentioned above — absurdly high taxes, economic micro-management, corporate welfare, out-of-control immigration and so-called Multiculturalism (AKA a recipe for civil war), currency debasement, and misuse of the military — are but a few of the practices that have cost Canadian taxpayers dearly over the past several decades.  How many billions have been squandered (after first being confiscated!), how many lives have been ruined, or even lost, because governments of the past decided, in their lack of wisdom, to go down these roads?  

It is clear, then, that avoiding dumb and counterproductive actions is vitally important, not least because it then saves resources for the truly beneficial things governments can do, such as providing transport infrastructure, keeping the civil peace, adjudicating disputes, protecting the borders, and ensuring the existence of a decent social safety net to be used by those who find themselves in dire financial circumstances through no fault of their own.  But where will Canadians find such governance?  Who can form a government which is capable of NOT engaging in stupid and counterproductive policy?

It won’t be the Liberals, that’s for sure.  Nor the NDP ; both of these are too busy thinking up new ways to restrict and regulate every facet of every Canadian’s life to bother themselves with such deep thoughts.  And the Conservative Party of Canada have lately developed an acute allergy to principles of any kind, to the point where the voter never knows where their stance is on any topic from one day to the next.   The Green Party, of course,  doesn’t bear mentioning.

No, friends, the only hope of this kind of wise, balanced governance is from the newest kid on the block, the Peoples Party of Canada.  It is growing by leaps and bounds every day, and Maxime is working hard to gather to it people of like mind to himself — people who believe in the natural liberty of all human beings, in true free enterprise, and in small, efficient government that always works for the benefit of the Common Man, and avoids doing patently dumb things.  

Like I said. . . an historic day.

On Finding the True Political Centre

Self-styled experts are fond of telling us that to be successful in politics, one must learn to be “kinda middle of the road”,  that you must be neither right nor left wing but rather a “centrist”.  This has almost become a sort of received wisdom, particularly in Canada, and politicians and their parties seem to be forever striving to be seen as the ones who are “claiming the centre ground”.  This would be admirable, and beneficial, except for one little thing.  Actually, one big thing.   The fact is, very few people  — and even fewer careerist politicians and bureaucrats —  understand what the terms “right-wing” and “left-wing” mean, and thus have no idea where the true centre lies, or what it means to be a true centrist.

Let us begin by defining the two terms placed in scare quotes above in plain language.  To put it simply,  a leftist believes in the supremacy of the State, that government is always good, always the answer to everything, and has  a role to play in most if not all aspects of the lives of the citizenry.  A rightist believes the opposite ; he distrusts all government, thinks it is at best incompetent and at worst willfully crooked, and thinks that he would be better off without it, or at least most of it.   

From this we can see that the extreme end of the left-wing spectrum is Totalitarianism, wherein the government controls the better part of the economy, strictly regulates the lives and actions of all the people, and even attempts to control the way they speak and think.   Examples of these extreme-left societies would be the old Soviet Union, Cuba under Castro, Nazi Germany, Fascist Italy, and of course, the good old PRC.   On the opposite end of the spectrum, we can see that the extreme right-wing position is literal anarchy —  no laws, no rules or principles, just every man for himself and the best man, on a given day, wins.   There are no long-term examples of any jurisdictions that thrived in a state of anarchy, for obvious reasons.

Clearly, life under a far-left government is intolerable to any psychologically normal person.  And anarchy, while it might sound like fun on the surface, is almost always the begetter of Totalitarian states — because in the vacuum created by a lack of basic law and order, you get a situation where the nastiest sociopathic control freaks battle it out to see who will be the top dog, and the winner(s) of that contest invariably impose a harsh police state in order to consolidate their power.  Not good!

So, what would constitute the true centre, and therefore a true centrist?

A true centrist believes this :  That there must be just enough rule of law to stop or at least discourage people from harming one another physically, financially or reputationally ;  that all people should have equal rights and responsibilities before the law, and no one person or group should receive special favours, or be purposely kept down ;  that taxation, although necessary, is an evil, and should kept to its lowest possible level, regardless of what systems may be used to collect it ;  that it is possible to have a social safety net while still preserving the individual’s freedom to choose ; and that each level of government ought to confine itself to its duties as outlined in the Constitution and refrain from other activities.   The true centrist believes that lawful authority and personal liberty must be in equilibrium, and therefore compliment and enhance each other.  

But where is this true centre to be found in Canada’s political landscape?  Not the Liberal Party ; not when they are led by a man who grew up at Fidel Castro’s feet and expresses his admiration for the Communist Party of China.  Nor do the CPC qualify anymore, if they ever really did ;  they have now drifted back toward the middle-left, and have become a (prospective) patron of special interests (how things have changed since Mr. H  was pushed aside!).  The NDP, while at least honestly deluded, remain in thrall to neo-Marxists, Trotskyites and trendy activists of every stripe.  A hopeless situation for the true centrist voter, then?

Ah, not so fast!  There is hope.  Hope that this country could at last have a balanced, fiscally and morally responsible government, one that respects all Canadians, and treats them as both  equals and as adults.  That hope is called . . .  the People’s Party of Canada.  Believe it, friends :  the PPC, and Maxime Bernier, are the real thing.  And it is quite possibly the first time that a truly national political party has been founded based on the premise that the concerns and welfare of the Average Canadian are the most important concerns of a proper and just government.  

Good governance, and an increase in general freedom and prosperity, are possible.  We just have to want it, and then labour to make it so.

Who’s in?

 

The Need for Clarity, or Why Political Correctness Has Got To Go

Offend someone today.  It’s your God-given right.

For the past quarter century or so, a nasty, pernicious, absurdly illogical phenomenon has been steadily creeping further and further into public discourse, to the point where it not only infects Academia (where at least it did not harm any sentient creatures) and the general media, but even our entertainment — novels, movies, music, you name it, it’s there.  It has caused the creation of a new sub-species of human being, the Professional Offence – taker, whose self-appointed duty is to spew forth manufactured outrage and to hound people out of society for saying innocuous things.  I speak, of course, of the phenomenon known as Political Correctness, or P.C. for short.  That it virtually rules in all of these areas is bad enough.  But worse still — far worse — is that it has infected our political dialogue as well, to the point where a meaningful discussion of almost any topic or policy is almost impossible to have.

Suggest that we should be vetting potential immigrants more carefully, to ensure terrorists and habitual criminals are refused entry?  Oh, that makes you a racist.  Or that people who practice “alternative lifestyles” could maybe just, you know, practice them in private, so that no one would care, and stop expecting everyone to “celebrate” it?  Well, that just makes you  a homo/trans/something – phobe!  Point out that not all religions are necessarily harmless, and that some do indeed teach some things that are, um, quite different from most of the others?  Why, you bigot, you!

Joking aside, this is where we find ourselves today :  An environment in which we cannot even talk about these (and other, even more important) subjects, because someone out there will seize on a comment (usually one that expresses plain, boldfaced truth) and use it as a cudgel to beat the unfortunate speaker senseless.   How we got here is not important, nor is the fact that the vast majority of people find P.C. laughable, for the most part.  Because it still hinders our political process, and that is hindering true progress in Canada.

For to craft, and promote, good, well-conceived public policy, policy that benefits the average Canadian rather than a few noisy special interest groups, we need one thing above all :  CLARITY.  Clarity, to allow us to first identify problems as clearly as possible, without having them buried in faux-polite euphemisms ;  clarity, that we may then hold serious discussions, with all sides putting forth their proposals and ideas (for how else do we ever arrive at the truth about anything, other than by open and informed debate?) ;  and clarity of purpose and action, to allow duly elected governments to enact the policies that will solve or at least mitigate some of the problems facing Canadians today.

But clarity becomes virtually impossible where the smelly, ruthless basilisk of P.C. is present.  For its only purposes are to cloud the truth, to render all language obscure and meaningless, and to bully sensible people into silence so that the Offence-takers and self-styled “Progressives” can own the Public Square, and get their little agendas pushed through.  P.C. has come a long way, it’s true, and has become an unfortunate fact of life for many of us, in nearly all walks of life.  But WE CAN FIGHT BACK.  Indeed, we must fight back.  We must retake the Public Square, so that common sense and the wisdom of real-world experience can once again rule the day (and the night too).

We do not need to be rude to accomplish this, nor do we need to start tossing around old racial or ethnic or chauvinist epithets.  That might get a few laughs, but it would play into their hands.  So, what to do then?  Try this :  the next time some P.C. clone  “calls you out”  for speaking honestly about something, or pretends to take offence at some harmless joke or quip. . . politely ignore them.  Or laugh at their pre-programmed P.C. response (good-naturedly, of course).   Point out to them that the very term Politically Correct indicates that the holder of such a position is being factually incorrect, on purpose, which means he or she is basically a willful liar.   And they are lying to themselves most of all.

Let us laugh Political Correctness out of the Public Square, and eventually out of existence.  Then we can get on with making this country, and the world, a better, freer, happier place.  We can do it, friends!